January 31, 2010

Student to Student Math Tutoring in Garrison

Originally published by Charlotte Rowe in the Putnam County News and Recorder on 12/9/09

This fall, Garrison seventhgrader Samantha Perlman has been helping second-grader Ruby Howell with her math assignments. They play games such as Money Bingo and use chips and blocks to review concepts like addition and subtraction. Flashcards reinforce skills such as telling time and counting money.
The girls join a dozen other such pairs in the school library Wednesday afternoons as part of a new peer tutoring program launched this fall by Middle School math teacher Sevim Akhondzadeh. “In my years of fieldwork and teaching at Garrison,” she notes, “I have seen how some students grasp the concepts of math more easily when a peer explains it to them rather than a teacher.”
The program builds on a tutoring initiative applied last year in the school’s language arts curriculum based on the teacher resource text “Kids as Reading Helpers: A Peer Tutor Training Manual.” In the reading model, schools can assist struggling young readers by training older students to serve as peer tutors. The manual is made available to educators through Intervention Central, a website created in 2000 by Jim Wright, a school psychologist and school administrator from central New York.

This fall, Garrison seventhgrader Samantha Perlman has been helping second-grader Ruby Howell with her math assignments. They play games such as Money Bingo and use chips and blocks to review concepts like addition and subtraction. Flashcards reinforce skills such as telling time and counting money.

The girls join a dozen other such pairs in the school library Wednesday afternoons as part of a new peer tutoring program launched this fall by Middle School math teacher Sevim Akhondzadeh. “In my years of fieldwork and teaching at Garrison,” she notes, “I have seen how some students grasp the concepts of math more easily when a peer explains it to them rather than a teacher.”

The program builds on a tutoring initiative applied last year in the school’s language arts curriculum based on the teacher resource text “Kids as Reading Helpers: A Peer Tutor Training Manual.” In the reading model, schools can assist struggling young readers by training older students to serve as peer tutors. The manual is made available to educators through Intervention Central, a website created in 2000 by Jim Wright, a school psychologist and school administrator from central New York.

To read more click here.

Filed under: Academic Learning Centers,K-8,Leadership,Peer-Tutoring

January 23, 2010

Tutoring program promotes reading success

Poinsettia plants are an undeniable symbol of the holiday season, but a group of local senior adults took time from the holidays to prepare to plant a different seed — one that it is hoped will bear fruit to last a lifetime.
“There is no doubt that if a child cannot read by the time he is in the third grade, there is going to be failure along the way. The seed has to be planted early in the child’s head that reading is important for future success,” Gloria Salas-Jennings, San Antonio Oasis Intergenerational Programs Coordinator, said.
Twelve senior adults took part in a two-day training session on Nov. 30 and Dec. 1 for the Intergenerational Tutoring Program, which pairs a senior adult, age 50 or older, with a child in grades first through third as a means to promote the child’s educational success through reading. The senior tutor spends an hour a week with the same child throughout the school year to help the child develop reading skills and build vocabulary. Currently, 200 tutors assist about 300 students in four local school districts including Northside, San Antonio, Edgewood and Alamo Heights.
The tutor training is led by Joyce Hughes, an educator of 33 years who retired from Northside ISD as a reading specialist. Hughes has been with the local program since it began in 1992.

Originally published by Javier A. Flores in mysanantonio.com on 12/2/09

Poinsettia plants are an undeniable symbol of the holiday season, but a group of local senior adults took time from the holidays to prepare to plant a different seed — one that it is hoped will bear fruit to last a lifetime.

“There is no doubt that if a child cannot read by the time he is in the third grade, there is going to be failure along the way. The seed has to be planted early in the child’s head that reading is important for future success,” Gloria Salas-Jennings, San Antonio Oasis Intergenerational Programs Coordinator, said.

Twelve senior adults took part in a two-day training session on Nov. 30 and Dec. 1 for the Intergenerational Tutoring Program, which pairs a senior adult, age 50 or older, with a child in grades first through third as a means to promote the child’s educational success through reading. The senior tutor spends an hour a week with the same child throughout the school year to help the child develop reading skills and build vocabulary. Currently, 200 tutors assist about 300 students in four local school districts including Northside, San Antonio, Edgewood and Alamo Heights.

The tutor training is led by Joyce Hughes, an educator of 33 years who retired from Northside ISD as a reading specialist. Hughes has been with the local program since it began in 1992.

To read more click here.

Filed under: Community

January 15, 2010

Charitable Foundation Provides Financial Support To Tutoring Program

Originally published in newsLI.com on 11/30/09

Freeport based Literacy Nassau has announced the receipt of a $10,000 grant from BJ’s Charitable Foundation. These funds have been designated by the Foundation’s board of directors to conduct critical tutor training workshops. According to Literacy Nassau’s Executive Director Tina Sanacore, “Volunteer tutors are the backbone of the services provided by Literacy Nassau. The generous funding provided by BJ’s Charitable Foundation has enabled us to create two Tutor Training Workshops in Freeport, and will result in the recruitment of 25 new tutors.” With a waiting list of more than 300 adult learners eager to meet with tutors, the philanthropic spirit displayed by BJ’s sets a wonderful example for the community.”

What Is A Tutor Training Workshop?
Held multiple times each year at libraries and other locations throughout Nassau County, Tutor Training Workshops prepare volunteers to work with adult learners who seek to improve their reading, writing and English language skills. Tutor Training Workshops last 15 hours over a span of five sessions. Daytime, evening and Saturday workshops are programmed to enable volunteers to participate based on their varying schedules. Additional professional development sessions held throughout the year and tutor roundtables, in addition to newsletters and other resources, provide tutors with the opportunity to share experiences and have questions or concerns addressed. No prior teaching experience is required; tutors come from all walks of life and represent a wide variety of trades and occupations.

To read more, click here.

Filed under: Academic Learning Centers,Community

January 8, 2010

Teen gets national recognition for volunteer tutoring efforts

by Tiffany Gibson, Las Vegas Sun, originally published on 11/19/09

After winning the Prudential Spirit Community Award twice, it’s safe to say Daniel Edmondson is not your average high school senior.

Last week, the 17-year-old Boulder City High School student was interviewed by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Communication and Outreach for a national video about his volunteer group called Teens Actively Contributing (TAC).
“The secretary of education decided to give credit for TAC and what it’s done,” Edmondson said. “They came out here with a video crew to capture what TAC is about.” Edmondson said he likes to think of TAC as a search engine for volunteer work. He said any teen can join the organization and participate in volunteer work. The group has more than 100 active members.

“We also offer kids who have volunteer ideas a source to do it,” Edmondson said. “They can get kids to sign up for their volunteer projects.” Edmondson said the filming was a little awkward at first. A crew followed him all day, beginning at school with a mock TAC meeting and ending at the Boulder City Hospital, where he volunteers on Mondays and Fridays.

He said his passion for volunteering began when he was 9 years old and teaching taekwondo to fellow students. A few years later, Edmondson said, he set up a tutoring program and now manages two programs, helping both elementary and middle school students. “My passion for volunteering comes from joy of sharing with others what I love and what I know,” Edmondson said. “I remember tutoring this kid that was failing and then he was passing. Then he was getting straight A’s. It’s like that satisfaction that you can make someone else’s life better.”

To read more, click here.

Filed under: Leadership,Peer-Tutoring

Network

For a free monthly newsletter,

"Best of Journal",

enter your email and click

"subscribe to newsletter"


SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Resources
Tutoring Foundations Tutor Training